Writing Prompt Wednesday: Medieval Time Travel

time-621043_640Hello, and welcome to this month’s final Writing Prompt Wednesday! Since this is our final Medieval Times-themed prompt, I thought we’d do something a bit different, with medieval-themed prompts related to the “fish-out-of-water” concept. You know what I’m talking about: stories where the main character just doesn’t fit in, and they have to make their way through a strange world that they don’t understand, and a world that, perhaps, doesn’t understand them.

By the way, I’m nowhere near qualified to speak on the science behind this, but it seems that it might actually be impossible to travel backwards through time, based on the fact that we’ve now observed that atomic nuclei don’t have to be symmetrical. That’s…at least kind of related to this week’s prompts. Promise.

 

Prompt 1

Write a story in which a famous scientist from history is transported to the present. Why would those responsible do this? What problems could this pose if they intended to send them back to their own time?

 

Prompt 2

Write a story in which an extra-terrestrial lands in medieval London. They can be hostile or friendly.

 

Prompt 3

Arthur C. Clarke once said that “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.”

Leonardo da Vinci is considered one of the most visionary men of the Renaissance, having drafted plans for such things as helicopters, parachutes, and even a primitive tank. What would he think about the televisions, computers, telephones, and this thing we call the internet? Do you think he would understand them as technology or magic?

Bonus question: Is there a difference?

 


Until next time,

K R Parkinson Monogram
– K R Parkinson
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Writing Prompt Wednesday: Still Alive!

Well, it finally happened. Yours truly got truly busy — and let a Writing Prompt Wednesday slip by without an update. Many apologies for the oversight. Have a few cookies for your trouble:

320px-chocolate_chip_cookies_-_kimberlykv

Now then, let’s get to the belated prompting, shall we? I think we’ll do a collection of story prompts this week. Of course, we’re keeping the Medieval Times theme.

 

Prompt 1

Write a story in which King Arthur and his Knights discover that the holy grail isn’t quite what they thought it would be.

 

Prompt 2

Two words: Steampunk Merlin.

 

Prompt 3

Complete the story:157px-john_william_waterhouse_-_the_crystal_ball

The three old witches sat opposite their King, eyes shut, mouths working to form the words of the spell. Palms facing outward, they pressed their wrists together to form a ‘V’ with their hands, focusing their energy toward the crystal ball placed in the center of the table. Occasionally, one of the old women would groan, straining to maintain her connection to the world of the unseen.

The King leaned forward to peer into the crystal ball. His heart raced with anticipation. If these old crones did what they claimed they could do, today he would…

 


And there you have it, folks. A day late, but as prompting as ever, if I do say so myself. Take care, and have a great week. See you next time!

K R Parkinson Monogram
– K R Parkinson

Photo credits:

Chocolate Chip Cookies by Kimberly Vardeman, used under CC BY 2.0 license.

The Crystal Ball by John William Waterhouse, work in public domain.

Writing Prompt Wednesday: Armor Documentary!

Greetings once again, readers. In keeping with the use of multimedia in last week’s prompt, this time I have a video about medieval heavy armor for you to check out. I’ve been doing some research on this topic lately, and this documentary was pretty helpful. It’s over 45 minutes long, but it’s interesting and informative, cheesiness notwithstanding.

Enjoy, and catch you next time!


K R Parkinson Monogram
– K R Parkinson

Writing Prompt Wednesday: Sedlec Ossuary

Since I feel like doing something a bit (okay, very) different this week, I decided to provide a series of eye-popping photos to jump-start your creativity instead of the typical text-based writing prompt fare. In keeping with this month’s theme, the following photos are from Sedlec Ossuary, located in the lower levels of the medieval-era Chapel of All Saints in Czechia (also known as the Czech Republic).

All Saints Chapel
Chapel of All Saints, Exterior. By user “Zp,” via Wikimedia Commons. Used under Creative Commons licence CC BY-SA 3.0

The site had been used as a burial ground for hundreds of years before František Rint was commissioned by the prominent Schwarzenberg family in the 1700s to place the bones in the Ossuary in some semblance of order. His solution for organizing the thousands upon thousands of bones and skeletons that had been laid to rest in the lower levels of the chapel?

Arrange them artistically, of course! The result of Rint’s work can be seen in the photographs below, including the incredible chandelier and the Coat of Arms of the House of Schwarzenberg. I’ve always wanted to see this place for myself, because the use of something many people consider sinister or taboo to provide a peculiar beauty to a sacred space is very inspiring to me.

While some people find such displays morbid and disrespectful to the dead, I think there’s an air of reverence to it, bringing to mind the passage from the Book of Genesis, “…for dust you are, and to dust you shall return,” a stark reminder that our lifetime is as valuable as it is limited.

Sedlec_Ossuary_Entrance_scale
Ossuary Entrance, with cross made of bones. Tyler Nofziger, via Wikipedia. Used under Creative Commons license CC BY 3.0
Kostnice03_scale
Coat of Arms of the House of Schwartzenberg. Originally posted to Flickr by user “word_virus.” Acquired for this post via Wikimedia Commons. Used under Creative Commons license CC BY 2.0
Sedlec-Ossuary_scale
Chandelier made of bones. By user “Chmouel,” via Wikimedia Commons. Used under Creative Commons license CC BY-SA 3.0

’til next time, remember to Write a Full Circle every day.

K R Parkinson Monogram
– K R Parkinson